Posted by: Anne | April 11, 2014

The Goodness of Good Friday

The Goodness of Good Friday

What a supreme paradox. We now call the day Jesus was crucified, Good.

Many believe this name simply evolved—as language does. They point to the earlier designation, “God’s Friday,” as its root. (This seems a reasonable conjecture, given that “goodbye” evolved from “God be with you.”)

Whatever its origin, the current name of this holy day offers a fitting lesson to those of us who assume (as is easy to do) that “good” must mean “happy.” We find it hard to imagine a day marked by sadness as a good day.

Of course, the church has always understood that the day commemorated on Good Friday was anything but happy. Sadness, mourning, fasting, and prayer have been its focus since the early centuries of the church.

Many Christians have historically kept their churches unlit or draped in dark cloths. Processions of penitents have walked in black robes or carried black-robed statues of Christ and the Virgin Mary. And worshippers have walked the “Stations of the Cross,” praying and singing their way past 14 images representing Jesus’ steps along the Via Dolorosa to Golgotha.

I like to think the linguistic accident that made “God’s Friday” into “Good Friday” was no accident at all. It was God’s own doing—a sharp, prophetic jab at a time and a culture obsessed by happiness. In the midst of consumerism’s Western playground, Good Friday [challenges] the sacred “pursuit of happiness.” The cross reveals this pursuit for what it is: a secondary thing.

This commemoration of Christ’s death reminds us of the human sin that caused this death. And we see again that salvation comes only through godly sorrow—both God’s and, in repentance, ours. To pursue happiness, we must first experience sorrow. He who goes forth sowing tears returns in joy.

At the same time, of course, Good Friday recalls for us the greatness and wonder of God’s love—that He should submit to death for us.

No wonder, in parts of Europe, the day is called not “Good,” but “Great” or “Holy” Friday.

Good Friday has always challenged merely human goodness. Its sad commemoration reminds us that in the face of sin, our goodness avails nothing. Only One is good enough to save us. That He did so is cause indeed for celebration.

Read more at the source:
www.christianitytoday.com/ch/news/2003/apr18.html

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Responses

  1. Good ness of Good friday…… happy good friday to all.


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